Backyard Discoveries: Travel Tips for a Jaunt in Jerome, AZ

Greetings, travelers! Knowing our love for ghost towns, it was just a matter of time before we made it to one of Arizona’s most popular historic mining towns, Jerome.

Even though mining in Jerome ended in 1953 (after 77 years!), the town is still a thriving tourist destination and artistic community with plenty of fun things to do and see.

Traveling Tips

The drive: The charming hillside spot is only about a two hour drive up north from Phoenix. There are spots to fuel up and stop along the way, but because the I-17 reduces to two lanes as you head toward Flagstaff (and unfortunately, as you head back) traffic can get kind of hairy, with REALLY long delays depending on what’s happening (holidays, ski/snowboarding season, etc.), so I would recommend filling up to a full tank of gas before you go.

IMG_2920

When to visit: Because it’s hopping tourist destination, Jerome stays pretty busy year-round. It helps that even during the hot summer months, it’s a few degrees cooler being farther up north. I know that we always stress getting somewhere in the early a.m., but it’s really true if you want to avoid the crowds and have the run of the town for yourself! Holidays are often the busiest, as well, but I think we lucked out because we got to Jerome just a bit after 10 a.m. – by the time we left around 2 p.m., the place was poppin’.

IMG_2905.JPG

If you like to hike: We recommend Dead Horse Ranch, a state park just 20 minutes away from Jerome. Don’t let the name throw you off, it’s a pleasant and expansive state park with a lot to offer. There are sites for campers, lagoons for fishing, areas for picnicking, and even a small river with a river walk. There are also, of course, hiking trails – I think we ended up hiking about 3 miles along their Lime Kiln trail. I would say this trail is easy to moderate, depending on your hiking experience – nothing too steep and no climbing required. Just always make sure that you a) have enough water (it doesn’t hurt to bring snacks for energy, either), b) know what trail you’re on and stay on it and c) know your limits.

IMG_2835

IMG_2830

IMG_2847

What to see: This is really traveler’s choice! We basically just walked around the town with no set agenda, but other travelers recommend the Douglas Mansion or Gold King Mine. Just remember that this is a hillside town, so you will be doing a LOT of walking upwards (and then blessedly, downwards).

Notable places we found on our stroll –

Jerome Grand Hotel

It wouldn’t be a ghost town without the ghosts. The Jerome Grand Hotel has a history of haunts – it was originally a hospital during the town’s mining days.

IMG_2879.JPG

Also fascinating, the hotel still has steam-powered heating and an OTIS elevator from 1926.

Holy Family Catholic Church

This church has been standing for more than 100 years. Visitors are welcome, and though it’s no longer an active parish, they do hold mass every third Saturday of the month.

IMG_2889.JPG

IMG_2899.JPG

La Victoria Studio

IMG_2912

Even if you’re visiting and the studio isn’t open, it’s still housed in a very cool structure.

From what we could tell and from what I’d heard from a family member, this is a pottery and glassblowing studio. Open hours seem… flexible. If you do manage to catch them when they’re open to the public, apparently they do pottery and glassblowing demos.

Getting your grub on: We ate at the Haunted Hamburger, and no, the burgers aren’t haunted, but the building supposedly is. Also, their outside patio offers a great view of the town below. There are plenty of other food stops to choose from, but they fill up FAST once they open (another reason to get there earlier rather than later).

IMG_2864.JPG

Anyone who knows us would not be surprised that Rickeldoris Candy and Popcorn Company was our very first stop in Jerome. It’s just as much of a treat for the eyes with a colorful selection of candies in jars, bins, boxes and an old-fashioned feel.

IMG_2855.JPG

We followed the delicious smell of kettle corn. I bought too much taffy, but I regret nothing.

Certainly, there’s plenty more to explore, but hopefully this will be a good starter guide for you.

Y’all come back now, ya hear?

With much affection,
The Nightborn Travel Team

 

jerome pinterest.png

 

Previous

Do’s and Don’ts for Travelers to Japan

Next

Happy Blogiversary to Me: Celebrating a Year with Nightborn Travel


Warning: Use of undefined constant comment - assumed 'comment' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/nightbor/public_html/wp-content/themes/lovecraft/comments.php on line 15
12 Comments

  1. tissy

    I have an affinity for discovery and you covered every aspect of Jerome – this is fantastic and may be on my next destination list!

  2. This is a keeper Thank you. I’m in California and this is on my list to visit. I love exploring old towns, the history and taking long road trips. This will be a place I will defiantly have to visit.

  3. What a great guide! I’ll save it for the future. I live in North Carolina in the Blueridge mountains. We love to travel, but never been to Arizona yet.

  4. I love ghost towns and Jerome looks amazing! I don’t know if I’d eat the the Haunted Hamburger though.. haha!

  5. Wowww i love ghosts towns too!! this is really a great guide 🙂 i definitely pin it <3

  6. supermillennial

    I live in Scottsdale I need to finally visit Jerome this looks super cool and have a few friends who have loved it!

  7. I have never been to Arizona, and actually haven’t heard of Jerome either. It looks like a wonderful community with so much beautiful scenery! If I ever make it out west, I will definitely try to check it out!

  8. Thanks for sharing this guide. I ‘ll share your post to my cousins, they are in California!

  9. Elizabeth O

    What a great guide. I am definitely put this on my bookmark as my future next travel destination. Will shared this too, to my friend who is residing in California.

  10. Amazing photos, and what a great visitors guide

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén